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View Poll Results: When do you think the Disney World Theme Parks will reopen?

Voters
49. You may not vote on this poll
  • May or June

    6 12.24%
  • July or August

    25 51.02%
  • September, October, November, or December

    14 28.57%
  • Not until at least 2021

    4 8.16%
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 48 of 48
  1. #41
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    We were also talking about the logistics of certain rides and queues. You wouldn't want everyone touching the interactive portions of queues, so that option would likely be gone. The rides that have pre-shows that they usually cram a bunch of people into would have to have those portions bypassed. Like the portrait room before the Haunted Mansion ride. So, again, seriously impacted experience.
    Susanne

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  3. #42
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    Sep 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheVBs View Post
    We were also talking about the logistics of certain rides and queues. You wouldn't want everyone touching the interactive portions of queues, so that option would likely be gone. The rides that have pre-shows that they usually cram a bunch of people into would have to have those portions bypassed. Like the portrait room before the Haunted Mansion ride. So, again, seriously impacted experience.
    Just think of all the people (and kids) that hang and lean on the rails as you clean. Good luck keeping those germ free.

    However, just like sending your kids to daycare and they were "always sick" those first couple years but then hardly ever miss a beat in the later years. We need herd immunity!
    Beth & David

    09/82 Treehouse Villas, 06/86 BVP, 10/95 CBC, 10/99 DI, 08/03 PORS, 10/05 POP, 11/06 AKL, 09/09 POLY, 10/10 Wonder, 05/11 Dream/PORS, 08/13 POLY, 11/13 GF, 04/15 POLY, 11/15 BLT, 11/16 Aulani, 03/17 BLT, 08/18 BLT, 07/19 AKL

  4. Likes Cinderelley, texas211 liked this post
  5. #43
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    Jul 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by baldburke View Post
    Just think of all the people (and kids) that hang and lean on the rails as you clean. Good luck keeping those germ free.

    However, just like sending your kids to daycare and they were "always sick" those first couple years but then hardly ever miss a beat in the later years. We need herd immunity!
    It comes down to it, these forms of entertainment really don't work with this clorox the world mentality. life has risk. Either go out and take the risk and rewards, or wear a bubble.
    ===================

    2016 POR
    2015 CS
    2014 WDW-Offsite
    2014 Disneyland-offsite
    2014 CBR
    2013 Dolphin
    2012 POR
    2012 WDW-Offsite
    2011 ASMusic, POR

    1998 Dixie Landings
    1990's, Dixie Landings, Misc Offsite

  6. #44
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    Feb 2009
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    Pesky science facts:

    "Herd immunity is an epidemiological concept that describes the state where a population – usually of people – is sufficiently immune to a disease that the infection will not spread within that group. In other words, enough people can't get the disease – either through vaccination or natural immunity – that the people who are vulnerable are protected.

    For example, let's think about mumps. Mumps is a very infectious disease that, while relatively benign, is very uncomfortable and sometimes causes nasty life-long complications. It's also vaccine-preventable, with a highly effective vaccine that has made the disease incredibly rare in the modern age.

    Mumps has a basic reproductive rate (R0) of 10-12, which means that in a population which is entirely susceptible – meaning no one is immune to the virus – every person who is infected will pass the disease on to 10-12 people.

    This means that without vaccination roughly 95 percent of the population gets infected over time. But even with something that is this infectious, there are still some people – 5 percent of the population – who don't get sick, because once everyone else is immune there's no one to catch the disease from.

    We can increase that number by vaccinating, because vaccination makes people immune to infection, but it also stops infected people passing on the disease to everyone that they otherwise would. If we can get enough people immune to the disease, then it will stop spreading in the population.

    And that's herd immunity, in a nutshell.

    For mumps, you need 92 percent of the population to be immune for the disease to stop spreading entirely. This is what's known as the herd immunity threshold. COVID-19 is, fortunately, much less infectious than mumps, with an estimated R0 of roughly 3.

    With this number, the proportion of people who need to be infected is lower but still high, sitting at around 70 percent of the entire population.

    Which brings us to why herd immunity could never be considered a preventative measure.

    If 70 percent of your population is infected with a disease, it is by definition not prevention. How can it be? Most of the people in your country are sick! And the hopeful nonsense that you can reach that 70 percent by just infecting young people is simply absurd. If only young people are immune, you'd have clusters of older people with no immunity at all, making it incredibly risky for anyone over a certain age to leave their house lest they get infected, forever.

    It's also worth thinking about the repercussions of this disastrous scenario – the best estimates put COVID-19 infection fatality rate at around 0.5-1 percent. If 70 percent of an entire population gets sick, that means that between 0.35-0.7 percent of everyone in a country could die, which is a catastrophic outcome.

    With something like 10 percent of all infections needing to be hospitalised, you'd also see an enormous number of people very sick, which has huge implications for the country as well.

    The sad fact is that herd immunity just isn't a solution to our pandemic woes. Yes, it may eventually happen anyway, but hoping that it will save us all is just not realistic. The time to discuss herd immunity is when we have a vaccine developed, and not one second earlier, because at that point we will be able to really stop the epidemic in its tracks.

    Until we have a vaccine, anyone talking about herd immunity as a preventative strategy for COVID-19 is simply wrong. Fortunately, there are other ways of preventing infections from spreading, which all boil down to avoiding people who are sick.

    So stay home, stay safe, and practice physical distancing as much as possible."

    It's frustrating, and scary, but reality. https://www.sciencealert.com/why-her...id-19-pandemic
    Susanne

  7. Thanks PopPhan thanked for this post
    Likes dnickels, PopPhan liked this post
  8. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheVBs View Post
    Pesky science facts:

    "Herd immunity is an epidemiological concept that describes the state where a population – usually of people – is sufficiently immune to a disease that the infection will not spread within that group. In other words, enough people can't get the disease – either through vaccination or natural immunity – that the people who are vulnerable are protected.

    For example, let's think about mumps. Mumps is a very infectious disease that, while relatively benign, is very uncomfortable and sometimes causes nasty life-long complications. It's also vaccine-preventable, with a highly effective vaccine that has made the disease incredibly rare in the modern age.

    Mumps has a basic reproductive rate (R0) of 10-12, which means that in a population which is entirely susceptible – meaning no one is immune to the virus – every person who is infected will pass the disease on to 10-12 people.

    This means that without vaccination roughly 95 percent of the population gets infected over time. But even with something that is this infectious, there are still some people – 5 percent of the population – who don't get sick, because once everyone else is immune there's no one to catch the disease from.

    We can increase that number by vaccinating, because vaccination makes people immune to infection, but it also stops infected people passing on the disease to everyone that they otherwise would. If we can get enough people immune to the disease, then it will stop spreading in the population.

    And that's herd immunity, in a nutshell.

    For mumps, you need 92 percent of the population to be immune for the disease to stop spreading entirely. This is what's known as the herd immunity threshold. COVID-19 is, fortunately, much less infectious than mumps, with an estimated R0 of roughly 3.

    With this number, the proportion of people who need to be infected is lower but still high, sitting at around 70 percent of the entire population.

    Which brings us to why herd immunity could never be considered a preventative measure.

    If 70 percent of your population is infected with a disease, it is by definition not prevention. How can it be? Most of the people in your country are sick! And the hopeful nonsense that you can reach that 70 percent by just infecting young people is simply absurd. If only young people are immune, you'd have clusters of older people with no immunity at all, making it incredibly risky for anyone over a certain age to leave their house lest they get infected, forever.

    It's also worth thinking about the repercussions of this disastrous scenario – the best estimates put COVID-19 infection fatality rate at around 0.5-1 percent. If 70 percent of an entire population gets sick, that means that between 0.35-0.7 percent of everyone in a country could die, which is a catastrophic outcome.

    With something like 10 percent of all infections needing to be hospitalised, you'd also see an enormous number of people very sick, which has huge implications for the country as well.

    The sad fact is that herd immunity just isn't a solution to our pandemic woes. Yes, it may eventually happen anyway, but hoping that it will save us all is just not realistic. The time to discuss herd immunity is when we have a vaccine developed, and not one second earlier, because at that point we will be able to really stop the epidemic in its tracks.

    Until we have a vaccine, anyone talking about herd immunity as a preventative strategy for COVID-19 is simply wrong. Fortunately, there are other ways of preventing infections from spreading, which all boil down to avoiding people who are sick.

    So stay home, stay safe, and practice physical distancing as much as possible."

    It's frustrating, and scary, but reality. https://www.sciencealert.com/why-her...id-19-pandemic
    Except that there are areas who have already reached herd immunity. Check out Sweden.
    I'll meet you at the Rainbow Bridge.

  9. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cinderelley View Post
    Except that there are areas who have already reached herd immunity. Check out Sweden.
    Except they haven’t reached it. By the way the death rate in Sweden is also one of the highest in the world due to the way they have attempted to combat the disease. The deaths have primarily occurred in older individuals so I guess if we are okay killing off our elders we could go that route. I kinda love my parents and grandparents though so I’ll take a pass, wear a mask....and hope for a vaccine.

  10. Likes dnickels, PopPhan liked this post
  11. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Fort Worth, Tx
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    For this modified experience, I don't see why you would want to go. Now in a few months, as things further lax, maybe.

    Now as far as let the old people die. Less than half a million have so far,, on a planet with just under 8 billion...
    ===================

    2016 POR
    2015 CS
    2014 WDW-Offsite
    2014 Disneyland-offsite
    2014 CBR
    2013 Dolphin
    2012 POR
    2012 WDW-Offsite
    2011 ASMusic, POR

    1998 Dixie Landings
    1990's, Dixie Landings, Misc Offsite

  12. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Telford, United Kingdom.......4,236 miles.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giggy View Post

    I had provisionally guessed for June and it may be a phased reopening, maybe starting with Downtown Disney, then Magic Kingdom at a significantly reduced capacity whilst new measures are tested out. Wouldn’t be surprised if Animal Kingdom was next because it is less densely populated with guests and Epcot and DHS are given a bit longer.
    My prediction wasn't that far away!
    Disney World Visits:
    1. May-June 1998 (3 weeks)
    2. May-June 2001 (3 weeks)
    3. October-November 2004 (2 weeks)
    4. August-September 2010 (2 weeks)
    5. August-September 2017 (2 weeks)

    NOW APPROACHING: 6. May 2021

  13. Likes texas211 liked this post

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